Wait, What? A Future Technology Forum

About


WHAT IS IT?

Wait, What? is a forum on future technologies … on their potential to radically change how we live and work, and on the opportunities and challenges these technologies will raise within the broadly defined domain of national security. Hosted by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and rooted in what’s already happening in today’s fastest evolving research fields, Wait, What? is designed to be a crucible for generating ideas that can stretch current conceptual horizons and accelerate the development of novel capabilities in the years and decades ahead.

WHO IS IT FOR?

Wait, What? is for forward-thinking scientists, engineers and other innovators interested in thinking interactively about the nature and scope of future technologies, their potential application to tomorrow’s technical and societal challenges and the quandaries those applications may themselves engender.

WHY PARTICIPATE?

The boundaries between scientific and technological disciplines such as biology, engineering and data science are fast disappearing, and remarkable insights and capabilities are emerging at those turbulent, transitioning intersections. Many innovators today are taking advantage of this rich intellectual and technical environment to pursue extraordinary new opportunities. Wait, What? will consider current and future advances in the physical and information sciences, engineering and mathematics through the lens of current and future national and global security dynamics, to reveal potentially attractive avenues of technological pursuit and to catalyze non-obvious synergies among participants.

WHY DARPA?

As the federal R&D agency tasked with preventing and fomenting strategic technological surprise, DARPA is committed to envisioning and ultimately shaping new technological trajectories. It does so in part by fostering discussions among leaders on the forward edge of change—to learn from them about emerging technologies worthy of attention or support, and to inspire them to consider applying their expertise to the important and rewarding worlds of public service and national security.

HOW WILL IT WORK?

Wait, What? will be a fast-paced gathering at which world-renowned thinkers and innovators from inside and outside DARPA will offer perspectives on where today’s advances are heading. Through a variety of channels, everyone will be encouraged to help extend those ideas further into the future. In addition to plenary sessions focused on topics of broad import and interest, Wait, What? will offer multiple themed breakout sessions, allowing participants to dive more deeply into particular topics. An exhibit area will feature displays describing a selection of DARPA programs that reflect the breadth of the agency’s work and range of its performers.


http://www.darpawaitwhat.com/

» Hyperloop Glides toward Reality in California Navigant Research

New Zealand Street Lighting Updates Could Make for an Attractive Market

 — May 5, 2015 

New Zealand lighting designer Bryan Kingestimates that his country is roughly 5 years behind the United States in terms of upgrading street light infrastructure from high-pressure sodium (HPS) to light-emitting diode (LED). Recent developments and a successful Road Lighting conference, however, may help close that gap quickly or even put the small country in the lead. This makes for an interesting case study in how a smaller market can rapidly shift from one technology to another, undergoing the process at a much faster rate than larger markets are capable of doing.

Favorable Factors

According to Navigant Research’s Smart Street Lighting report, there are an estimated 370,000 street lights installed in New Zealand. This represents a small fraction of the installed base of the United States and other large countries, making the challenge of upgrading far less daunting. Another significant factor that this country has in its favor is that municipal lighting is generally owned by the municipality, rather than by a utility that may not have a financial incentive to reduce electricity consumption, especially during nighttime hours. In addition, 50% of funding for street lighting comes from the NZ Transport Agency. This government agency has recently stipulated that its funding must be spent on LED lights and not on older lamp technologies. That alone will spur retrofit projects and likely means that no new HPS luminaires will be purchased.

The recently held Road Lighting 2015 conference is also expected to drive adoption of both LED street lighting and networked street lighting control. The conference organizers were able to gather representatives from a significant portion of the country’s municipalities, who then learned from city managers and other experts from around the world who have already implemented LED and controls projects. While decision makers in the United States often seem reluctant to draw on international experiences, decision makers in New Zealand were quite eager to benefit from the lessons learned by their peers around the globe.

Road Lighting

A significant focus of the Road Lighting conference was on the use of networked controls to deliver advanced control features to street lighting systems. As discussed in Smart Street Lighting,networked systems are being adopted in ever growing numbers around the world, but many municipalities have upgraded to LEDs without also adding controls. A new and widely adopted American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard (136.41)means that adding controls after a luminaire has been installed is relatively simple, but it still involves physically accessing every single street light. Thus, it entails a cost and effort that deters many municipalities. New Zealand is in an excellent position to take advantage of the benefits of both LEDs and controls, installing both of these now maturing technologies at the same time to reduce costs.

It is yet to be seen just how quickly New Zealand will adopt LED street lighting and networked lighting control. The City of Auckland has announced plans to switch all of its lights to LEDs in the next 5 years, and the timeline is expected to be similar for other cities and only slightly slower for smaller municipalities. So, while the total market size is modest, the rapid changeover when conditions are ripe can still make a small market attractive to international manufacturers.



Why Elon Musk is donating millions to make artificial intelligence safer

Tesla founder Elon Musk, along with two other organizations, have given $7 million to researchers looking for ways to avoid any problems caused by artificial intelligence.


 


woops



Two rival self-driving cars have close call in California
Two self-drivingprototype cars, one operated by Google Inc and theother by Delphi Automotive Plc, had a close call on aSilicon Valley street earlie..



Quantum entanglement

Quantum entanglement: "As a result, measurements performed on one system seem to be instantaneously influencing other systems entangled with it."



'via Blog this'

Funny Code

Humorous and informative article about code.






 http://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2015-paul-ford-what-is-code/




Laser keyboard

this tech combines a laser with a digital camera of the iPhone variety, but with compact footprint. It reads the infrared fingerprints left when you type a key painted by the laser. 

Takes 2 AA batteries.


How To Make Any Song Your iPhone Ringtone

How To Make Any Song Your iPhone Ringtone

Love "Shake It Off" so much you wish you could wake up to it every morning? Don't waste money buying a ringtone from the iTunes store. Any song in your iTunes library can be made into a ringtone. Just open iTunes and follow these steps.
1. Figure out which part of the song you want for your ringtone. You'll need to remember the start and stop time down to the second.

2. Right click on the song and select "Get Info."
3. Select the Options tab. Remember those numbers from Step 1? Plug them in for the start time and stop time, then click OK.
4. Listen to the song again. You'll need to make sure it's the length you want, so adjust the start and stop time until it's perfect.
5. Right click the song again and select "Create AAC Version." After you do this, you'll notice that there are now two versions of the song in your iTunes library.
6. Right click on the new file. Select "Show in Finder" if you're on a Mac, or select "Show in Windows Explorer" on a PC. That'll open up a new window and bring up both versions of the song in the iTunes Media folder. The one you want will be highlighted.
7. Right click, select "Get Info" and rename with .m4r. We need our file to be in this format so it can be recognized as a ringtone. My song currently reads "06 Shake It Off 1.m4a,' so I change it to say "06 Shake It Off.m4r." Then I hit enter.
Once you do so, it'll ask permission to say it will be a different file type. Select "Use .m4r."
8. Copy the .m4r file to your desktop. Go back to iTunes and delete the shortened version of the song by right clicking and selecting "Delete."
9. Drag the file from your desktop to your iTunes library under Music. It will then appear in your Tones section.
10. Sync your iPhone to your computer. While still in your iPhone menu on iTunes, go to Tones and select Sync Tones. Then hit "Sync" or "Apply."
Now, the ringtone is ready to go. On your iPhone, go to Settings > Sounds > Ringtone and your new tone will be above the built-in ones.
Before you start showing it off, you have some quick cleaning to do: We need to get your original song back to normal. Get back into iTunes on your computer and find the original song, which is still there. Right-click on it and select Get Info > Options. Uncheck the boxes next to Start Time and Stop Time.
You can also make ringtones on the iPhone itself with the free app GarageBand. For a tutorial on that method, check out this video.
Evernote helps you remember everything and get organized effortlessly. Download Evernote.


Powerwall | Tesla Motors

​Just so you know, this is amazing:


Powerwall | Tesla Motors





New Tesla Battery Could End Electricity Bills

I thought you would be interested in this story I found on MSN: New Tesla Battery Could End Electricity Bills http://a.msn.com/00/en-us/BBiU7fs?ocid=se